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Friday, July 17, 2020 | History

1 edition of Patient incentives to motivate doctor visits and reduce hypertension disparities found in the catalog.

Patient incentives to motivate doctor visits and reduce hypertension disparities

Laurie T. Martin

Patient incentives to motivate doctor visits and reduce hypertension disparities

by Laurie T. Martin

  • 366 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by RAND in Santa Monica, CA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hypertension,
  • Office Visits,
  • Healthcare Disparities,
  • Prevention & control,
  • Socioeconomic Factors,
  • Quality of Health Care

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    StatementLaurie T. Martin ... [et al.].
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25116078M
    ISBN 109780833059918
    LC Control Number2011047883

      Patient level factors due to patients' own lack of trust in healthcare providers, the healthcare system and the government (GAO , Healthy People ) are believed to be one such cause, especially when there are racial and/or ethnic differences between patients and providers (Boulware et al. ).   Those patients who had more than a 10 percent weight loss were able to reduce their need for blood pressure medications by 50 percent, on .

    Groups With Disparities: Overall in , rates of avoidable admission for hypertension were higher for Blacks and Hispanics than for Whites ( and , respectively, compared with per , population). Rates were lower for API s compared with Whites ( vs. per , population). Nursing Care Plans for Hypertension. Once a patient is found to have high blood pressure, it’s important to follow the appropriate nursing diagnosis and nursing care plan for hypertension in order to reduce the effects of hypertension and keep the patient’s health and quality of life high. Below are six nursing care plans for hypertension.

    ]. There is much less work, however, on the ability of doctors to identify patients with low expected costs. Doctors selecting patients according to their underlying health has been studied in the context of “report card” policies—public disclosures of the patient health outcomes of individual doctors. Paying health care providers to meet quality goals is an idea with widespread appeal, given the common perception that quality of care in the United States remains unacceptably low despite a decade.


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Patient incentives to motivate doctor visits and reduce hypertension disparities by Laurie T. Martin Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Patient incentives to motivate doctor visits and reduce hypertension disparities. [Laurie T Martin;] -- InCIGNA Healthcare and RAND partnered in an initiative that examined the extent to which small financial incentives for patients can motivate physician visits and reduce racial/ethnic.

Patient Incentives to Motivate Doctor Visits and Reduce Hypertension Disparities [Martin, Laurie T., Acosta, Joie D., Ruder, Teague, Schonlau, Matthias, Fremont, Allen] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Patient Incentives to Motivate Doctor Visits and Reduce Hypertension DisparitiesAuthor: Laurie T.

Martin, Joie D. Acosta, Teague Ruder, Matthias Schonlau, Allen Fremont. Examines whether small financial incentives for patients can motivate physician visits and reduce racial/ethnic disparities in hypertension. Hypertensive patients who received a one-time $15 payment to see a doctor and were provided educational materials were more likely to schedule a visit, and pre-hypertensive patients saw a significant and Author: Laurie T.

Martin, Joie D. Acosta, Teague Ruder, Matthias Schonlau, Allen Fremont. Author(s): Martin,Laurie T(Laurie Thayer), Title(s): Patient incentives to motivate doctor visits and reduce hypertension disparities/ Laurie T.

Martin. Patient-directed financial incentives paired with educational materials significantly increased the percentage of patients who had a primary care visit at 3 months after implementation (% vs % of controls), particularly for patients who had not seen a physician in over a year and for those with moderately high hypertension.

A Patient Visits The Doctor With A Special Problem -Hilarious Sketch By Danish Ali. EBOOK Patient Incentives to Motivate Doctor Visits and Reduce Hypertension Disparities.

Latoria. [FREE] EBOOK A Patient s Perspective: Tips for Your Doctor Visits and More BEST COLLECTION. Zaida Jurgensen. [FREE] EBOOK A Patient s Perspective: Tips. Patient Incentives to Motivate Doctor Visits and Reduce Hypertension Disparities.

Examines whether small financial incentives for patients can motivate physician visits and reduce racial/ethnic disparities in hypertension. This book reviews suicide epidemiology in the military, catalogs military suicide-prevention activities.

The findings also can help motivate increased efforts to intervene at the state, tribal, and local levels to address health disparities and inequalities.

Recommended Actions to Reduce Health Disparities 1. Increase community awareness of disparities as persistent problems that represent some of the most pressing health challenges in the U.S. Patient Incentives from Payers Encourage Preventive Care Visits Payers are turning to patient incentives in order to encourage beneficiaries to engage in preventive care visits.

Introduction. Hypertension is a global public health issue, and it is estimated that by more than billion individuals worldwide will have hypertension, accounting for up to 50% of heart disease risk and 75% of stroke risk. 1 Lowering blood pressure (BP) through lifestyle modification, antihypertensive medications, or both can substantially reduce an individual's risk for subsequent.

Received a $, Robert Woods Johnson Foundation grant for a proposal in collaboration with RAND “Patient Incentives to Motivate Doctor Visits and Reduce Hypertension Disparities” in Lippincott Solutions are multiple expert solutions that combine practical tools, up-to-date evidence-based content and best practices with advanced online workflow functionality that nurses and allied health professionals can use to provide extraordinary patient care.

admissions or emergency department visits) or the profile of typical patients in the CPT prefatory language. There is a need to reduce geographic and racial/ethnic disparities in health through provision of CCM services. Table 2 provides a number of resources for identifying and engaging subpopulations to help reduce these disparities.

BACKGROUND. Byit is predicted that more than billion individuals worldwide will have hypertension, accounting for up to 50% of heart disease risk and 75% of stroke risk. 1 For several decades it has been well known that lowering blood pressure (BP) with lifestyle modification, medications, or both can substantially reduce a patient’s subsequent risk for disease.

2 For each mm. The specific aims of the study are to (1) Demonstrate feasibility of combining behavioral economics with state-of-the-art telehealth technology to deliver an optimal incentive strategy to the specific group of patients to promote adherence and reduce BP, and (2) Compare the effectiveness of two types of incentives, i.e., pure financial and.

a second visit following the assessment of the provider’s records, or it may take place the same day. There are advantages and disadvantages to each approach. If CoCASA has been used, the summary report that is generated can identify specific subsets of patients (e.g., those who have not completed the series because of a missed opportunity.

The Evidence-Based Guidelines for the Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults, was developed by panel members appointed to the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC.

Patient Incentives to Motivate Doctor Visits and Reduce Hypertension Disparities Publications: Nwankwo T, Yoon SS, Burt V, Gu Q. Hypertension among adults in the United States: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Hypertension (high blood pressure) • Stroke • Cancer number had grown to million, and byexperts project that million will be affected.3 These diseases affect more than one in two adults and more than one in four children in the United States.

More than 25 percent live with multiple chronic conditions.4 The incidence of multiple. How many people are uninsured. For the second year in a row, the number of uninsured increased. Inmillion nonelderly individuals were uninsured, an increase of.

The trend toward value-based care is accelerating, and is more urgent as the climbing costs of care threaten gains in health coverage. As the field is moving toward new ways of paying for value, attention to health care disparities is sorely lacking.

Not for lack of need — since the publication of the Institute of Medicine’s Unequal Treatment report, we’ve seen evidence that.Background: Health disparities have a major impact in the quality of life and clinical care received by minorities in the United States.

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare cardiopulmonary disorder that affects children and adults and that, if untreated, results in premature death. In Ohio, percent of black patients have a diagnosis of hypertension, compared to percent for white patients, according to the National Association of County and City Health Officials.

Black men are also 49 percent more likely to die from stroke and 21 percent more likely to die from heart disease than white men.